Macedonian Armies after Alexander 323-168 BC by Nicholas Sekunda

Macedonian Armies after Alexander 323-168 BC (Men-at-Arms) by Nicholas Sekunda,‎ Peter Dennis (Illustrator)
Requirements: .PDF reader, 5.7 Mb
Overview: Macedonia, the heartland of Alexander’s dominions, was ruled first by the heirs of Antipater, Alexander’s regent, and then by the descendents of Alexander’s general Antigonus I Monophthalmus (‘the One-Eyed’). For well over a century the largely mercenary armies of Alexander’s successors imposed their influence in matters of military costume, kit, doctrine and tactics over the whole of the Near East, while absorbing local military practices.

After Rome’s decisive defeat of Carthage in 202 BC and the subsequent Roman dominance over the Western Mediterranean, Macedonia came under increasing pressure from the Romans. Three wars between the two powers culminated in the Roman victory at Pydna in 168 BC, which marked the final destruction of Alexander’s empire and established Roman authority over the Near East.

Drawing upon a wide array of archaeological and written sources and written by a noted authority on the Hellenistic period, this survey of the organisation, battle history and appearance of the armies of Alexander’s successors is lavishly illustrated with specially commissioned full-colour artwork. It is an essential resource for all those interested in the development of warfare in the Eastern Mediterranean and Near East in the turbulent centuries following the death of Alexander.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

Continue reading “Macedonian Armies after Alexander 323-168 BC by Nicholas Sekunda”

Macedonian Armies after Alexander 323-168 BC by Nicholas Sekunda

Macedonian Armies after Alexander 323-168 BC (Men-at-Arms) by Nicholas Sekunda,‎ Peter Dennis (Illustrator)
Requirements: .PDF reader, 5.7 Mb
Overview: Macedonia, the heartland of Alexander’s dominions, was ruled first by the heirs of Antipater, Alexander’s regent, and then by the descendents of Alexander’s general Antigonus I Monophthalmus (‘the One-Eyed’). For well over a century the largely mercenary armies of Alexander’s successors imposed their influence in matters of military costume, kit, doctrine and tactics over the whole of the Near East, while absorbing local military practices.

After Rome’s decisive defeat of Carthage in 202 BC and the subsequent Roman dominance over the Western Mediterranean, Macedonia came under increasing pressure from the Romans. Three wars between the two powers culminated in the Roman victory at Pydna in 168 BC, which marked the final destruction of Alexander’s empire and established Roman authority over the Near East.

Drawing upon a wide array of archaeological and written sources and written by a noted authority on the Hellenistic period, this survey of the organisation, battle history and appearance of the armies of Alexander’s successors is lavishly illustrated with specially commissioned full-colour artwork. It is an essential resource for all those interested in the development of warfare in the Eastern Mediterranean and Near East in the turbulent centuries following the death of Alexander.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

Continue reading “Macedonian Armies after Alexander 323-168 BC by Nicholas Sekunda”

The Wars of Alexander’s Successors 323-281 BC V2 by Bob Bennett

The Wars of Alexander’s Successors 323-281 BC, Volume 2: Armies, Tactics and Battles by Bob Bennett, Mike Roberts
Requirements: .PDF reader, 61.2 MB
Overview: When the dying Alexander the Great was asked to whom he bequeathed his vast empire, he supposedly replied to the strongest . There ensued a long series of struggles between his generals and governors for control of these vast territories. Most of these Diadochi, or successors, were consummate professionals who had learnt their trade under Alexander and, in some cases, his father Philip. This second volume studies how they applied that experience and further developed the art of war in a further four decades of warfare. This is a period rich in fascinating tactical developments. The all-conquering Macedonian war machine developed by Philip and Alexander was adapted in various ways (such as the addition of war elephants) by the different successors according to their resources. Siege and naval warfare is also included."
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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The War of Alexander’s Successors 323-281 BC V1 by Bob Bennett

The War of Alexander’s Successors 323-281 BC: Volume 1: Commanders and Campaigns by Bob Bennett , Mike Roberts
Requirements: .MOBI reader, 3.3 MB
Overview: When the dying Alexander the Great was asked to whom he bequeathed his vast empire, he supposedly replied ‘to the strongest’. There ensued a long series of struggles between his generals and governors for control of these territories. Most of these Diadochi (Successors) were consummate professionals who had learnt the art of war under Alexander or even his father, Philip. Few died a peaceful death and the last survivors of this tough breed were still leading their armies against each other well into their seventies.

Colourful characters, epic battles, treachery and subterfuge make this a period with great appeal to anyone interested in ancient history and ancient warfare in particular. The wars shaped the map from the Balkans to India for the next couple of centuries.

This first volume introduces the key personalities – characters such as Antigonos ‘Monopthalmus’ (the One-eyed) and his son ‘Demetrius ‘Poliorcetes’ (the Besieger), Seleucus ‘Nicator’ (‘the Victorious’) and Ptolemy ‘Soter’ (‘the Saviour’) – and gives a narrative of the causes and course of these wars from the death of Alexander to the Battle of Corupedium (281 BC) when the last two original Diadochi faced each other one final time.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

Continue reading “The War of Alexander’s Successors 323-281 BC V1 by Bob Bennett”