Dark Days of Georgian Britain by James Hobson

Dark Days of Georgian Britain: Rethinking the Regency by James Hobson
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 3.9MB
Overview: A historian reveals the grittier side of Regency England, far from the country houses and costume balls of high society.

Often upheld as a period of elegance with many achievements in the fine arts and architecture, the Regency era also encompassed a time of great social, political, and economic upheaval. In this insightful social history, the emphasis is on the lives of those not born into nobility-what it was like for the poor, and what challenges they faced. Using a wide range of sources, James Hobson shares the stories of real people. He explores corruption in government and elections, "bread or blood" rioting, the political discontent felt, and the revolutionaries involved. He explores attitudes to adultery and marriage, and the moral panic about homosexuality. Grave robbery is exposed, along with the sharp pinch of food scarcity, prison, and punishment. Venturing beyond the images we have from Jane Austen’s novels or costume-drama films, this book reveals a society where the popular hatred of the Prince Regent was widespread and where laws and new capitalist attitudes oppressed the poor-a society in the throes of change.
Genre: Non-fiction > History

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Klop: Britain’s Most Ingenious Secret Agent by Peter Day

Klop: Britain’s Most Ingenious Secret Agent by Peter Day
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 1.9 MB
Overview: Klop Ustinov was Britain’s most ingenious secret agent, but he wasn’t authorised to kill. Instead, he was authorised to tell tall tales, bemusing and beguiling his enemies into revealing their deepest, darkest secrets. From the Russian Revolution to the Cold War, he bluffed and tricked his way into the confidence of everyone from Soviet commissars to Gestapo Gruppenfuhrer.

In ‘Klop: Britain’s Most Ingenious Secret Agent,’ journalist Peter Day brings to life a man descended from Russian aristocrats and Ethiopian princesses but who fancied himself the perfect Englishman. His codename was U35 but his better-known nickname ‘Klop’ meant ‘bedbug’, a name given to him by a very understanding wife on account of his extraordinary capacity to hop from one woman’s bed to another in the service of the King.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Biographies & Memoirs

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The Real Lives of Roman Britain by Guy de la Bédoyère (Bedoyere)

The Real Lives of Roman Britain by Guy de la Bédoyère(Bedoyere)
Requirements: .PDF reader, 9 MB
Overview: An innovative, informative, and entertaining history of Roman Britain told through the lives of individuals in all walks of life
The Britain of the Roman Occupation is, in a way, an age that is dark to us. While the main events from 55 BC to AD 410 are little disputed, and the archaeological remains of villas, forts, walls, and cities explain a great deal, we lack a clear sense of individual lives. This book is the first to infuse the story of Britannia with a beating heart, the first to describe in detail who its inhabitants were and their place in our history.
A lifelong specialist in Romano-British history, Guy de la Bédoyère is the first to recover the period exclusively as a human experience. He focuses not on military campaigns and imperial politics but on individual, personal stories. Roman Britain is revealed as a place where the ambitious scramble for power and prestige, the devout seek solace and security through religion, men and women eke out existences in a provincial frontier land. De la Bédoyère introduces Fortunata the slave girl, Emeritus the frustrated centurion, the grieving father Quintus Corellius Fortis, and the brilliant metal worker Boduogenus, among numerous others. Through a wide array of records and artifacts, the author introduces the colorful cast of immigrants who arrived during the Roman era while offering an unusual glimpse of indigenous Britons, until now nearly invisible in histories of Roman Britain.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Rebuilding Britain’s Blitzed Cities by Catherine Flinn

Rebuilding Britain’s Blitzed Cities: Hopeful Dreams, Stark Realities by Catherine Flinn
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 8.6 MB
Overview: Many British cities were devastated by bombing during the Second World War and faced stark economic dilemmas concerning reconstruction planning and implementation after 1945. How did politicians, civil servants and local authorities manage to produce the cities we live in today? Rebuilding Britain’s Blitzed Cities examines the underlying processes and pressures, especially financial and bureaucratic, which shaped postwar urbanism in Britain.

Catherine Flinn integrates architectural planning with in-depth economic and political analyses of Britain’s blitzed cities for the first time. She examines early reconstruction arrangements, the postwar economic apparatus and the challenges of postwar physical planning across the country, while providing insightful case studies from the cities of Hull, Exeter and Liverpool.

By addressing the ideology versus the reality of reconstruction in postwar Britain, Rebuilding Britain’s Blitzed Cities highlights the importance of economic and political factors for understanding the British postwar built environment.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Charity Market and Humanitarianism in Britain by Sarah Roddy+

The Charity Market and Humanitarianism in Britain, 1870-1912 by Sarah Roddy , Julie-Marie Strange, Bertrand Taithe
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 4.0 MB
Overview: This book examines the business of charity – including fundraising, marketing, branding, financial accountability and the nexus of benevolence, politics and capitalism – in Britain from the development of the British Red Cross in 1870 to 1912.

Whilst most studies focus on the distribution of charity, Sarah Roddy, Julie-Marie Strange and Bertrand Taithe look at the roots of the modern third sector, exploring how charities appropriated features more readily associated with commercial enterprises in order to compete and obtain money, manage and account for that money and monetize compassion.

Drawing on a wide range of archival research from Charity Organization Societies, Wood Street Mission, Salvation Army, League of Help and Jewish Soup Kitchen, among many others, The Charity Market and Humanitarianism in Britain, 1870-1912 sheds new light on the history of philanthropy in the Victorian and Edwardian periods.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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The Real Lives of Roman Britain by Guy de la Bédoyère(Bedoyere)

The Real Lives of Roman Britain by Guy de la Bédoyère(Bedoyere)
Requirements: .PDF reader, 9 MB
Overview: An innovative, informative, and entertaining history of Roman Britain told through the lives of individuals in all walks of life
The Britain of the Roman Occupation is, in a way, an age that is dark to us. While the main events from 55 BC to AD 410 are little disputed, and the archaeological remains of villas, forts, walls, and cities explain a great deal, we lack a clear sense of individual lives. This book is the first to infuse the story of Britannia with a beating heart, the first to describe in detail who its inhabitants were and their place in our history.
A lifelong specialist in Romano-British history, Guy de la Bédoyère is the first to recover the period exclusively as a human experience. He focuses not on military campaigns and imperial politics but on individual, personal stories. Roman Britain is revealed as a place where the ambitious scramble for power and prestige, the devout seek solace and security through religion, men and women eke out existences in a provincial frontier land. De la Bédoyère introduces Fortunata the slave girl, Emeritus the frustrated centurion, the grieving father Quintus Corellius Fortis, and the brilliant metal worker Boduogenus, among numerous others. Through a wide array of records and artifacts, the author introduces the colorful cast of immigrants who arrived during the Roman era while offering an unusual glimpse of indigenous Britons, until now nearly invisible in histories of Roman Britain.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Britain’s Oceanic Empire by H. V. Bowen +

Britain’s Oceanic Empire: Atlantic and Indian Ocean Worlds, c.1550-1850 by H. V. Bowen,‎ Elizabeth Mancke,‎ John G. Reid (Editors)
Requirements: .MOBI reader, 2.6 MB
Overview: This pioneering comparative study of British imperialism in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean worlds draws on the perspectives of British newcomers overseas and their native hosts, metropolitan officials and corporate enterprises, migrants and settlers. Leading scholars examine the divergences and commonalities in the legal and economic regimes that allowed Britain to project imperium across the globe. They explore the nature of sovereignty and law, governance and regulation, diplomacy, military relations and commerce, shedding new light on the processes of expansion that influenced the making of empire. While acknowledging the distinctions and divergences in imperial endeavours in Asia and the Americas – not least in terms of the size of indigenous populations, technical and cultural differences, and approaches to indigenous polities – this book argues that these differences must be seen in the context of what Britons overseas shared, including constitutional principles, claims of sovereignty, disciplinary regimes and military attitudes.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Gothic Britain by William Hughes, Ruth Heholt

Gothic Britain: Dark Places in the Provinces and Margins of the British Isles by William Hughes, Ruth Heholt
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 1,2 Mb
Overview: Gothic Britain is the first collection of essays to consider how the Gothic responds to, and is informed by, the British regional experience. Acknowledging how the so-called United Kingdom has historically been divided upon nationalistic lines, the twelve original essays in this volume interrogate the interplay of ideas and generic innovations generated in the spaces between the nominal kingdom and its component nations and, innovatively, within those national spaces. Concentrating upon fictions depicting England, Scotland and Wales specifically, Gothic Britain comprehends the generic possibilities of the urban and the rural, of the historical and the contemporary, of the metropolis and the rural settlement – as well as exploring, uniquely, the fluid space that is the act of travel itself. Reading the textuality of some two hundred years of national and regional identity, Gothic Britain interrogates how the genre has depicted and questioned the natural and built environments of the Island of Great Britain.
Genre: Non-Fiction > General

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The Occult Imagination in Britain by Christine Ferguson

The Occult Imagination in Britain, 1875-1947 (Among the Victorians and Modernists) by Christine Ferguson, Andrew Radford
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 3.3 MB
Overview: Between 1875 and 1947, a period bookended, respectively, by the founding of the Theosophical Society and the death of notorious occultist celebrity Aleister Crowley, Britain experienced an unparalleled efflorescence of engagement with unusual occult schema and supernatural phenomena such as astral travel, ritual magic, and reincarnationism. Reflecting the signal array of responses by authors, artists, actors, impresarios and popular entertainers to questions of esoteric spirituality and belief, this interdisciplinary collection demonstrates the enormous interest in the occult during a time typically associated with the rise of secularization and scientific innovation. The contributors describe how the occult realm functions as a turbulent conceptual and affective space, shifting between poles of faith and doubt, the sacrosanct and the profane, the endemic and the exotic, the forensic and the fetishistic. Here, occultism emerges as a practice and epistemology that decisively shapes the literary enterprises of writers such as Dion Fortune and Arthur Machen, artists such as Pamela Colman Smith, and revivalists such as Rolf Gardiner
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy > Occult

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