Royal Wills in Britain from 1509 to 2008 by Michael L. Nash

Royal Wills in Britain from 1509 to 2008 by Michael L. Nash
Requirements: .PDF reader, 2.3 Mb
Overview: This is the first book on Royal Wills since 1780 and aims to take over where the previous ones (in 1775 and 1780) left off. Therefore the period 1509 to 2008 is covered. It aims to uncover the many dilemmas and conundrums they have had to deal with, against a backdrop of Imperial splendor and political strife, society scandals and in later instances, a disintegrating infrastructure. This period covers the wills of Henry VIII, Edward VI and George I, which all sought to divert the accepted rules of succession; the wills of Queen Charlotte and George III, which brought into sharp focus the differences between State and Personal property; and the wills from Prince Albert to the present day (with a few exceptions) which sought to exclude the public from seeing their contents, in devices known as ‘closing’ and ‘sealing up’ the wills. The authority by which the latter was done has been seriously questioned in signal cases in 2007 and 2008. Sources drawn upon include not only the Royal Archives, but the Kilmorey Papers in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, and the Teck Letters in Wellington College, where Prince Frank received much of his early education. The sealed will of Prince Frank of Teck, the brother of Queen Mary and great-uncle of the present Queen, is the seminal chapter in this study.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Royal Wills in Britain from 1509 to 2008 by Michael L. Nash

Royal Wills in Britain from 1509 to 2008 by Michael L. Nash
Requirements: .PDF reader, 2.3 Mb
Overview: This is the first book on Royal Wills since 1780 and aims to take over where the previous ones (in 1775 and 1780) left off. Therefore the period 1509 to 2008 is covered. It aims to uncover the many dilemmas and conundrums they have had to deal with, against a backdrop of Imperial splendor and political strife, society scandals and in later instances, a disintegrating infrastructure. This period covers the wills of Henry VIII, Edward VI and George I, which all sought to divert the accepted rules of succession; the wills of Queen Charlotte and George III, which brought into sharp focus the differences between State and Personal property; and the wills from Prince Albert to the present day (with a few exceptions) which sought to exclude the public from seeing their contents, in devices known as ‘closing’ and ‘sealing up’ the wills. The authority by which the latter was done has been seriously questioned in signal cases in 2007 and 2008. Sources drawn upon include not only the Royal Archives, but the Kilmorey Papers in the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, and the Teck Letters in Wellington College, where Prince Frank received much of his early education. The sealed will of Prince Frank of Teck, the brother of Queen Mary and great-uncle of the present Queen, is the seminal chapter in this study.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Britain’s Lost Revolution? by Daniel Szechi

Britain’s lost revolution?: Jacobite Scotland and French grand strategy, 1701-8 by Daniel Szechi
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 4.1 MB
Overview: The orthodox view of eighteenth-century Britain is of a stable polity dominated by politeness and commercialism. It projects a world that was safe and comfortable for the landed elite and full of opportunity for the middling sorts marching towards their Victorian destiny.

But what kind of stable polity undergoes two revolutions within one hundred years and lapses into internal war on seven occasions during 1688-1803? Our cosy vision of the eighteenth century is surely deep-seated, but it cannot cope with revolutionary movements like Jacobitism, the American Patriots and the United Irishmen. By recovering a ‘lost’ rebellion that had a serious chance of triggering a revolution as sweeping as that of 1688, this book directly challenges the paradigm.
We have long assumed that the Jacobite movement was reactionary and hostile to reform of any kind. Yet in the early eighteenth century, the Scottish Jacobite movement was transformed into a vehicle for revolutionary change. In the course of the political battles against Anglo-Scottish union, the Scots Jacobites broke with their past and developed a new, radical ideology. At its core was a vision of a future Scotland in which a Stuart restoration went hand-in-hand with a new constitution that would have reduced the Stuart dynasty to mere figureheads presiding over a noble demi-republic. It would also have been a Scotland directly economically attached to France and its empire, and thus able to demand a far more equal relationship with England. Using newly discovered sources from French and Scottish archives this exciting new book challenges our fundamental assumptions regarding the emergence of the fully British state in the early eighteenth century.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Britain and Foreign Affairs 1815-1885 by John Lowe

Britain and Foreign Affairs 1815-1885: Europe and Overseas by John Lowe
Requirements: .ePUB, .MOBI/.AZW reader, 2.MB
Overview: Lowe examines British foreign policy from Castlereagh to Disraeli. Focusing on relations with other European and non-European powers, the author discusses attitudes to empire and analyzes socio-economic and political factors.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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The Islamic State in Britain by Michael Kenney

The Islamic State in Britain: Radicalization and Resilience in an Activist Network by Michael Kenney
Requirements: .PDF reader, 24.5 Mb
Overview: This book contains an ethnographic study of al Muhajiroun, an outlawed radical jihadist group in London. Kenney seeks to explain how, despite intense police surveillance, the group survived, attracted adherents, and recruited fighters to join the war in Syria until the British government banned it in 2010. Ideological sympathy, ties of friendship, charismatic leaders, and youthful inexperience led people to join the group. Once there, they learned how to be activists by watching more experienced members, often imbibing even more dangerous ideologies along the way. Tight subgroups permitted the movement to deflect government pressure by frequently reconfiguring themselves and fostering ambiguity about their purposes. As they aged, some members left for more normal lives, while others turned to different, often more radical groups. These broad conclusions are hardly new, but some readers may be surprised by Kenney’s argument that such groups can allow young men to let off steam, thus containing, rather than promoting, violence. As the authorities stamp out these organizations, their disgruntled members may pose an even greater danger.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Educational > Politics & Social Sciences

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Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing

Programmed Inequality: How Britain Discarded Women Technologists and Lost Its Edge in Computing [Audiobook]

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Empire: How Britain Made the Modern World by Niall Ferguson

Empire: How Britain Made the Modern World by Niall Ferguson
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 4,7 MB
Overview: This astoundingly successful, superbly reviewed book vividly recreates the excitement, brutality and adventure of the British Empire. Ferguson’s most revolutionary and popular work, EMPIRE is a major reinterpretation of the British Empire as one of the world’s greatest modernising forces. It shows on a vast canvas how the British Empire in the 19th Century spearheaded real globalisation with steampower, telegraphs, guns, engineers, missionaries and millions of settlers.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Tim Peake and Britain’s Road To Space by Erik Seedhouse

Tim Peake and Britain’s Road To Space by Erik Seedhouse
Requirements: .PDF reader, 21.9 Mb
Overview: For centuries the British developed a reputation as a nation of explorers. From Francis Drake’s circumnavigation of the globe to the ascent of Everest, British explorers crossed oceans and continents and ventured where few, if any, had gone before. Until very recently, that legacy of exploration had not extended to space. For decades, successive governments chose to stay out of the human spaceflight programme, but in 2008 there were signs of optimism when ESA selected a new class of six astronauts, including, for the first time, a British representative: Timothy Peake.

This book puts the reader in the flight suit of Britain’s first male astronaut. In addition to delving into the life of Tim Peake, this book discusses the learning curves required in astronaut and mission training and the complexity of the technologies required to launch an astronaut and keep them alive for months on end. This book underscores the fact that technology and training, unlike space, do not exist in a vacuum; complex technical systems, like the ISS, interact with the variables of human personality, and the cultural background of the astronauts. But ultimately, this is the story of Tim Peake and the Principia mission and the down-to-the-last-bolt descriptions of life aboard the ISS, by way of the hurdles placed by the British government and the rigors of training at Russia’s Star City military base.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Educational

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The Roman Iron Industry in Britain by David Sim

The Roman Iron Industry in Britain by David Sim
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 6.2MB
Overview: The invasion of AD 43 began the Romans’ settlement of Britain. The Romans brought with them a level of expertise that raised iron production in Britain from small localised sites to an enormous industry. Rome thrived on war and iron was vital to the Roman military establishment as well as to the civil population. In this pioneering work, David Sim combines current ideas of iron-making in Roman times with experimental archaeology. The Roman Iron Industry in Britain stretches far beyond dry theory and metallurgy alone; it covers all the stages of this essential process, from prospecting to distribution, and describes the whole cycle of iron production. Photographs and line drawings illustrate the text well enough to allow keen readers to reproduce the artefacts for themselves. Fascinating to the general reader and all those with an interest in Roman history, this book is invaluable to students of archaeology and professional archaeologists alike. Dr David Sim is an archaeologist who has combined studies of the technology of the Roman Empire with his skills as a blacksmith.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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The History of Great Britain by Anne B. Rodrick

The History of Great Britain, Second Edition by Anne B. Rodrick
Requirements: .PDF reader, 5 MB
Overview: This addition to The Greenwood Histories of the Modern Nations provides an updated, clear, and concise history of Great Britain that will be of value to undergraduates and to a general readership
Presents a timeline of significant events with an at-a-glance overview of Great Britain’s history, Provides an appendix of notable people in the history of Great Britain and brief biographies of those who have made important contributions in history, Offers photos and maps as additional context to support the text, Features an annotated bibliography with detailed information on resources for further study
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Post-Victorian Britain 1902-1951 by L.C.B. Seaman

Post-Victorian Britain 1902-1951 by L.C.B. Seaman
Requirements: .PDF reader, 4 Mb
Overview: This comprehensive survey of English history during the first half of the twentieth century has three main themes: the political and social consequences of the replacement of the Liberal Party by the Labour Party; the continuous development of the welfare state; and the changes in England’s imperial and international position caused by the ambitions of Germany and Japan and by the emergence of the U.S.A and the U.S.S.R as world powers. The leading personalities of the period are brilliantly portrayed and the issues challengingly presently.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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D-Day Britain’s Home Front by John Leete

D-Day (Britain’s Home Front): A selection of anecdotes from the build-up and launch of D-Day in June 1944 by John Leete
Requirements: ePUB Reader, 740 kB
Overview: This book contains a selection of anecdotes from some of the many people who experienced the build-up to and launch of D-Day in June 1944. These anecdotes are taken from original diary notes sourced from family records and county archives as well as from emails resulting from appeals for information placed in local newspapers. I also conducted personal interviews and, in the process, met people with great humility and with amazing stories to tell. I have had a fascination with the subject from my childhood curiosity with pillboxes and the many strange wartime structures I saw as I travelled with my family around the country. At age ten, I was given a tin helmet found in the garden of a house in the East End where my grandfather lived, and I subsequently started to collect ‘bits and pieces’, the scrappage of war.My first book The New Forest at War was published in 2004 and remains a best seller. I have also written national and other local titles, all based on anecdotes and from extensive archival research into Britain during the period 1939 – 1945.This book is part of an ongoing research project into the history of Britain’s Home Front during WW2. Society changes and attempts are made to rewrite history. Here the real voices of the people are heard, ensuring the story of ‘The Greatest Generation’ remains available to new and existing audiences.’We must never forget the dedication and sacrifice of a generation and the human spirit that persists even against the most overwhelming odds.
Genre: Non-Fiction, History

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Roman Britain, 1st Edition 2019

Roman Britain, 1st Edition 2019
Requirements: .PDF reader, 80.2mb
Overview: In 43 CE, Roman legionaries set foot on British soil. It wasn’t the first attempt – the Romans had tried twice before to take the island – but this time, the invasion was going to work. The legions battled their way through modern-day England, taking out the tribes who wouldn’t willingly submit to Roman rule. As the soldiers made their way further north, the native Celts fought for their lives and their homeland, but the enemy was too strong. The Romans were here to stay.
Genre: Magazines & Newspapers

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Discover Britain – June/July 2019

Discover Britain – June/July 2019
Requirements: PDF Reader 62.three MB
Overview: Showcasing the most productive of the British Isles.
Celebrating the most productive of our country, each factor of Discover Britain is filled with options from historical past to commute. Read concerning the occasions that modified historical past, in addition to British traditions and their origins, or be impressed in your subsequent travel with nice concepts for the place to head and what to look. Whether you are making plans a weekend town ruin or an get away to the nation-state, Discover Britain is your very important information to getting probably the most from your keep.
Genre: Magazine –

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