Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream by Jay Rubenstein

Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream: The Crusades, Apocalyptic Prophecy, and the End of History by Jay Rubenstein
Requirements: .PDF reader, 3.8 MB
Overview: In 1099, the soldiers of the First Crusade took Jerusalem. As the news of this victory spread throughout Medieval Europe, it felt nothing less than miraculous and dream-like, to such an extent that many believed history itself had been fundamentally altered by the event and that the Rapture was at hand. As a result of military conquest, Christians could see themselves as agents of rather than mere actors in their own salvation.

The capture of Jerusalem changed everything. A loosely defined geographic backwater, comprised of petty kingdoms and shifting alliances, Medieval Europe began now to imagine itself as the center of the world. The West had overtaken the East not just on the world’s stage but in God’s plans. To justify this, its writers and thinkers turned to ancient prophecies, and specifically to one of the most enigmatic passages in the Bible the dream King Nebuchadnezzar has in the Book of Daniel, of a statue with a golden head and feet of clay. Conventional interpretation of the dream transformed the state into a series of kingdoms, each less glorious than the last, leading inexorably to the end of all earthly realms– in short, to the Apocalypse. The First Crusade signified to Christians that the dream of Nebuchadnezzar would be fulfilled on their terms. Such heady reconceptions continued until the disaster of the Second Crusade and with it, the collapse of any dreams of unification or salvation-any notion that conquering the Holy Land and defeating the Infidel could absolve sin.

In Nebuchadnezzar’s Dream, Jay Rubenstein boldly maps out the steps by which these social, political, economic, and intellectual shifts occurred throughout the 12th century, drawing on those who guided and explained them. The Crusades raised the possibility of imagining the Apocalypse as more than prophecy but actual event. Rubenstein examines how those who confronted the conflict between prophecy and reality transformed the meaning and memory of the Crusades as well as their place in history.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Midnight on the Mavi Marmara by Moustafa Bayoumi

Midnight on the Mavi Marmara: The Attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla and How It Changed the Course of the Israel/Palestine Conflict by Moustafa Bayoumi
Requirements: .PDF reader, 1.1 Mb
Overview: At 4:30 AM on Monday, May 31, 2010, Israeli commandos, boarding from sea and air, attacked the six boats of the Gaza Freedom Flotilla as it sailed through international waters attempting to bring humanitarian relief to the beleaguered Palestinians of Gaza. Within minutes, nine peace activists were dead, shot by the Israelis. Scores of others were injured.

Within hours, outrage at Israel’s action echoed around the world. Spontaneous demonstrations occurred in Europe, the United States, Turkey, and Gaza itself to denounce the attack. Turkey’s prime minister described it as a "bloody massacre" and "state terrorism."

In these pages, a range of activists, journalists, and analysts piece together the events that occurred that May night. Mixing together first-hand testimony and documentary record with hard-headed analysis and historical overview, Midnight on the Mavi Marmara reveals why the attack on the Gaza Freedom Flotilla may just turn out to be Israel’s Selma, Alabama moment: the beginning of the end for an apartheid Palestine.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Mexicans in Revolution, 1910-1946 by William H. Beezley+ +

Mexicans in Revolution, 1910-1946: An Introduction by William H. Beezley, Colin M. MacLachlan
Requirements: .ePUB, .PDF reader, 1.4 Mb
Overview: On November 20, 1910, Mexicans initiated the world’s first popular social revolution. The unbalanced progress of the previous regime triggered violence and mobilized individuals from all classes to demand social and economic justice. In the process they shaped modern Mexico at a cost of two million lives.

This accessible and gripping account guides the reader through the intricacies of the revolution, focusing on the revolutionaries as a group and the implementation of social and political changes. In this volume written for the revolution’s centennial, William H. Beezley and Colin M. MacLachlan recount how the revolutionary generation laid the foundation for a better life for all Mexicans.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Masters of the Middle Waters by Jacob F. Lee

Masters of the Middle Waters: Indian Nations and Colonial Ambitions along the Mississippi by Jacob F. Lee
Requirements: .PDF reader, 4.1 Mb
Overview: America’s waterways were once the superhighways of travel and communication. Cutting a central line across the landscape, with tributaries connecting the South to the Great Plains and the Great Lakes, the Mississippi River meant wealth, knowledge, and power for those who could master it. In this ambitious and elegantly written account of the conquest of the West, Jacob Lee offers a new understanding of early America based on the long history of warfare and resistance in the Mississippi River valley.

Lee traces the Native kinship ties that determined which nations rose and fell in the period before the Illinois became dominant. With a complex network of allies stretching from Lake Superior to Arkansas, the Illinois were at the height of their power in 1673 when the first French explorers―fur trader Louis Jolliet and Jesuit priest Jacques Marquette―made their way down the Mississippi. Over the next century, a succession of European empires claimed parts of the midcontinent, but they all faced the challenge of navigating Native alliances and social structures that had existed for centuries. When American settlers claimed the region in the early nineteenth century, they overturned 150 years of interaction between Indians and Europeans.

Masters of the Middle Waters shows that the Mississippi and its tributaries were never simply a backdrop to unfolding events. We cannot understand the trajectory of early America without taking into account the vast heartland and its waterways, which advanced and thwarted the aspirations of Native nations, European imperialists, and American settlers alike.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History > Native American Demographic Studies

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MacArthur’s Spies by Peter Eisner

MacArthur’s Spies: The Soldier, the Singer, and the Spymaster Who Defied the Japanese in World War II by Peter Eisner
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 21.9 Mb
Overview: A thrilling story of espionage, daring and deception set in the exotic landscape of occupied Manila during World War II.

On January 2, 1942, Japanese troops marched into Manila unopposed by U.S. forces. Manila was a strategic port, a romantic American outpost and a jewel of a city. Tokyo saw its conquest of the Philippines as the key in its plan to control all of Asia, including Australia. Thousands of soldiers surrendered and were sent on the notorious eighty-mile Bataan Death March. But thousands of other Filipinos and Americans refused to surrender and hid in the Luzon hills above Bataan and Manila. MacArthur’s Spies is the story of three of them, and how they successfully foiled the Japanese for more than two years, sabotaging Japanese efforts and preparing the way for MacArthur’s return.

From a jungle hideout, Colonel John Boone, an enlisted American soldier, led an insurgent force of Filipino fighters who infiltrated Manila as workers and servants to stage demolitions and attacks. "Chick" Parsons, an American businessman, polo player, and expatriate in Manila, was also a U.S. Navy intelligence officer. He escaped in the guise of a Panamanian diplomat, and returned as MacArthur’s spymaster, coordinating the guerrilla efforts with the planned Allied invasion.

And, finally, there was Claire Phillips, an itinerant American torch singer with many names and almost as many husbands. Her nightclub in Manila served as a cover for supplying food to Americans in the hills and to thousands of prisoners of war. She and the men and women who worked with her gathered information from the collaborating Filipino businessmen; the homesick, English-speaking Japanese officers; and the spies who mingled in the crowd.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Julius Evola: The Sufi of Rome by Frank Gelli

Julius Evola: The Sufi of Rome by Frank Gelli
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 247 KB
Overview: A memoir and a revelation on the Traditionalist master Julius Evola. By a hitherto unknown disciple. An insight into Evola’s hidden Sufi identity.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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If You Can Keep It by Eric Metaxas

If You Can Keep It: The Forgotten Promise of American Liberty by Eric Metaxas
Requirements: .ePUB, .MOBI/.AZW reader, 794 KB
Overview: From the #1 New York Times bestselling author Eric Metaxas comes If You Can Keep It, a new book that is part history and part manifesto, steeped in a critical analysis of our founding fathers’ original intentions for America. Two hundred and forty years after the Declaration of Independence, it examines how we as a nation are living up to our founders’ lofty vision for liberty and justice.

If You Can Keep It is at once a thrilling review of America’s uniqueness, and a sobering reminder that America’s greatness cannot continue unless we truly understand what our founding fathers meant for us to be. The book includes a stirring call-to-action for every American to understand the ideals behind the "noble experiment in ordered liberty" that is America. It also paints a vivid picture of the tremendous fragility of that experiment and explains why that fragility has been dangerously forgotten-and in doing so it lays out our own responsibility to live those ideals and carry on those freedoms. Metaxas believes America is not a nation bounded by ethnic identity or geography, but rather by a radical and unprecedented idea, based upon liberty and freedom. It’s time to reconnect to that idea before America loses the very foundation for what made it exceptional in the first place.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History > Politics

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History as Wonder by Marnie Hughes-Warrington

History as Wonder: Beginning with Historiography by Marnie Hughes-Warrington
Requirements: .PDF reader, 2.4MB
Overview: History and Wonder is a refreshing new take on the idea of history that tracks the entanglement of history and philosophy over time through the key idea of wonder.

From Ancient Greek histories and wonder works, to Islamic curiosities and Chinese strange histories, through to European historical cabinets of curiosity and on to histories that grapple with the horrors of the Holocaust, Marnie Hughes-Warrington unpacks the ways in which historians throughout the ages have tried to make sense of the world, and to change it. This book considers histories and historians across time and space, including the Ancient Greek historian Polybius, the medieval texts by historians such as Bede in England and Ibn Khaldun in Islamic Historiography, and the more recent works by Martin Heidegger, Luce Irigaray and Ranajit Guha among others. It explores the different ways in which historians have called upon wonder to cross boundaries between the past and the present, the universal and the particular, the old and the new, and the ordinary and the extraordinary. Promising to both delight and unsettle, it shows how wonder works as the beginning of historiography.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Gunship Over Angola by Steve Joubert

Gunship Over Angola: The Story of a Maverick Pilot by Steve Joubert
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 4.4 MB
Overview: Growing up in suburban Pretoria, Steve Joubert dreamed of a career as a pilot. After undergoing SAAF pilot training, a freak injury put an end to his hopes of flying fighter jets. Instead he learned to fly the versatile Alouette helicopter.

He had barely qualified as a chopper pilot when he was sent to the Border, where he flew missions over Namibia and southern Angola to supply air cover to troops on the ground. As a gunship pilot, Steve saw some of the worst scenes of war, often arriving first on the scene after a contact or landmine attack.

He also recalls the lighter moments of military life, as well as the thrill of flying. A born maverick, his lack of respect for authority often got him into trouble with his superiors.

His experiences affected him deeply, and led him eventually to question his role in the war effort. As the Border War escalated, his disillusionment grew. This gripping memoir is a powerful plea for healing and understanding.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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France & American Civil War by Stève (Steve) Sainlaude +

France and the American Civil War: A Diplomatic History by Stève Sainlaude, Don H. Doyle, Jessica Edwards
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 6.6 MB
Overview: France’s involvement in the American Civil War was critical to its unfolding, but the details of the European power’s role remain little understood. Here, Steve Sainlaude offers the first comprehensive history of French diplomatic engagement with the Union and the Confederate States of America during the conflict. Drawing on archival sources that have been neglected by scholars up to this point, Sainlaude overturns many commonly held assumptions about French relations with the Union and the Confederacy. As Sainlaude demonstrates, no major European power had a deeper stake in the outcome of the conflict than France.

Reaching beyond the standard narratives of this history, Sainlaude delves deeply into questions of geopolitical strategy and diplomacy during this critical period in world affairs. The resulting study will help shift the way Americans look at the Civil War and extend their understanding of the conflict in global context.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Forgotten Voices Desert Victory by Julian Thompson

Forgotten Voices Desert Victory by Julian Thompson, Imperial War Museum
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 2.0 MB
Overview: For Britain in the first half of World War II, the importance of defending the Middle East against the Axis powers was second only to defending the homeland against invasion. Had the Allies lost in North Africa, the vital life-line through the Suez Canal to Australia and India would have been cut. More crucial was protecting the route to the oilfields of the Persian Gulf. Without oil, Britain could not fight. The initial threat came from a large Italian Army, who, from their bases in Libya, were quick to take British-held ground in Egypt. Yet the professional British soldiers, along with tough all-volunteer regiments from Australia and New Zealand, easily defeated the poorly lead Italians. Churchill, confident that this front was secure, transferred troops and equipment to Greece, little realizing what the remaining troops would face when Rommel and his Panzer Division arrived. With their armies fighting over vast distances on rugged terrain, and supply lines often stretched to breaking point, both Rommel and the then little-known General Montgomery had to take huge tactical risks. Good intelligence was vital, so the elite Long Range Desert Group was formed, capable of covert operations behind enemy lines. David Stirling famously founded the SAS in the Western Desert, trained to perform audacious sabotage missions. Told in the voices of the men who were there this is the story of the Western Desert, and how the Allies struck the first successful blow to Axis forces and achieved this remarkable Second World War victory.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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England’s Striking History by Chris Henry Perkins

England’s Striking History. A Brief History of England and Its Silver Hammered Coinage By Chris Henry Perkins
Requirements: .PDF reader, 11 MB
Overview: ngland’s Striking History. A Brief History of England and Its Silver Hammered Coinage
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Dakota in Exile by Linda M. Clemmons

Dakota in Exile: The Untold Stories of Captives in the Aftermath of the U.S.-Dakota War (Iowa and the Midwest Experience) by Linda M. Clemmons
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 13,6 Mb
Overview: Robert Hopkins was a man caught between two worlds. As a member of the Dakota Nation, he was unfairly imprisoned, accused of taking up arms against U.S. soldiers when war broke out with the Dakota in 1862. However, as a Christian convert who was also a preacher, Hopkins’s allegiance was often questioned by many of his fellow Dakota as well. Without a doubt, being a convert-and a favorite of the missionaries-had its privileges. Hopkins learned to read and write in an anglicized form of Dakota, and when facing legal allegations, he and several high-ranking missionaries wrote impassioned letters in his defense. Ultimately, he was among the 300-some Dakota spared from hanging by President Lincoln, imprisoned instead at Camp Kearney in Davenport, Iowa, for several years. His wife, Sarah, and their children, meanwhile, were forced onto the barren Crow Creek reservation in Dakota Territory with the rest of the Dakota women, children, and elderly. In both places, the Dakota were treated as novelties, displayed for curious residents like zoo animals.

Historian Linda Clemmons examines the surviving letters from Robert and Sarah; other Dakota language sources; and letters from missionaries, newspaper accounts, and federal documents. She blends both the personal and the historical to complicate our understanding of the development of the Midwest, while also serving as a testament to the resilience of the Dakota and other indigenous peoples who have lived in this region from time immemorial.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Coping with the Nazi Past by Philipp Gassert, Alan E. Steinweis

Coping with the Nazi Past: West German Debates on Nazism and Generational Conflict, 1955-1975 by Philipp Gassert & Alan E. Steinweis (eds.)
Requirements: .PDF reader, 2.3 MB
Overview: Based on careful, intensive research in primary sources, many of these essays break new ground in our understanding of a crucial and tumultuous period. The contributors, drawn from both sides of the Atlantic, offer an in-depth analysis of how the collective memory of Nazism and the Holocaust influenced, and was influenced by, politics and culture in West Germany in the 1960s. The contributions address a wide variety of issues, including prosecution for war crimes, restitution, immigration policy, health policy, reform of the police, German relations with Israel and the United States, nuclear non-proliferation, and, of course, student politics and the New Left protest movement.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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