Cultures of Plague by Samuel K. Cohn Jr.

Cultures of Plague: Medical Thinking at the End of the Renaissance by Samuel K. Cohn Jr.
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Overview: Cultures of Plague opens a new chapter in the history of medicine. Neither the plague nor the ideas it stimulated were static, fixed in a timeless Galenic vacuum over five centuries, as historians and scientists commonly assume. As plague evolved in its pathology, modes of transmission, and the social characteristics of its victims, so too did medical thinking about plague develop. This study of plague imprints, from academic medical treatises to plague poetry, highlights the most feared and devastating epidemic of the sixteenth-century, one that threatened Italy top to toe from 1575 to 1578 and unleashed an avalanche of plague writing. From erudite definitions, remote causes, cures and recipes, physicians now directed their plague writings to the prince and discovered their most ‘valiant remedies’ in public health: strict segregation of the healthy and ill, cleaning streets and latrines, addressing the long-term causes of plague-poverty. Those outside the medical profession joined the chorus.
In the heartland of Counter-Reformation Italy, physicians, along with those outside the profession, questioned the foundations of Galenic and Renaissance medicine, even the role of God. Assaults on medieval and Renaissance medicine did not need to await the Protestant-Paracelsian alliance of seventeenth-century in northern Europe. Instead, creative forces planted by the pandemic of 1575-8 sowed seeds of doubt and unveiled new concerns and ideas within that supposedly most conservative form of medical writing, the plague tract. Relying on health board statistics and dramatized with eyewitness descriptions of bizarre happenings, human misery, and suffering, these writers created the structure for plague classics of the eighteenth century, and by tracking the contagion’s complex and crooked paths, they anticipated trends of nineteenth-century epidemiology.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Migrations And Cultures: A World View

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Mummies, Disease And Ancient Cultures

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Cultures in Conflict: American Civil War by way of Steven E. Woodworth

Cultures in Conflict: The American Civil War by way of Steven E. Woodworth
Requirements: .PDF reader, 14.7 Mb
Overview: The American Civil War used to be basically a war of cultures, and slavery used to be the biggest unmarried cultural issue setting apart North and South. This number of sparsely decided on memoirs, diaries, letters, and recollections of atypical Northerners and Southerners who skilled the conflict as squaddies or civilians brings to existence the war in tradition, rules, attitudes, hopes, braveness, and struggling of all sides. Woodworth, a Civil War historian, has decided on all kinds of shifting first particular person accounts, each and every of which tells a tale of a existence in addition to the attitudes of atypical folks and the true prerequisites of conflict and homefront. Woodworth gifts the conflict within the phrases of those that lived it.

Contrasting alternatives will lend a hand the reader to peer the conflict during the eyes of Northerners and Southerners as: squaddies get ready for conflict; girls’s lives trade after the boys move to conflict; squaddies on all sides revel in the difficulties of camp existence; sweethearts (the half-sister of Mary Todd Lincoln and her Confederate fiancé) change heartfelt letters; a husband’s letters and his spouse’s diary recount their love, his demise in fight, and her deep loss, countered by way of her religion; squaddies and civilians recount the carnage of the conflict’s devastating battles; and folks on all sides replicate at the end result of the conflict and its penalties to their way of living. The accounts distinction the writers’ attitudes towards Northern and Southern society, the rules for which the ones societies stood, and the non secular importance of the conflict. These accounts and the narrative dialogue of the adaptation in tradition will lend a hand readers to grasp the Civil War as a war of cultures. Telling the tale of the conflict as private historical past makes the revel in of the Civil War come alive for readers.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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The Routledge Handbook Of Participatory Cultures

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The Routledge Handbook Of Participatory Cultures

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Multilevel Analysis of Individuals and Cultures

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Africa and France. Postcolonial cultures, migration, and racism

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Cultures in Conflict The American Civil War (The Greenwood Press Cultures in Conflict Series)

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Radicalism and Music: An Introduction to the Music Cultures of al-Qa’ida, Racist Skinheads, Christian-Affiliated Radicals, and Eco-Animal Rights Militants

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Coal Cultures by Derrick Price

Coal Cultures: Picturing Mining Landscapes and Communities (Photography, Place, Environment) by Derrick Price
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 8,1 Mb
Overview: Coal is the commodity that powered the technologies that made the modern world. It also brought about unique communities marked by a high degree of social solidarity and self-help.

Mining was central to working class life, drawing rural populations into industrial labour, but it often took place in picturesque landscapes, so that its black spoil heaps became a central symbol of the degradation of pastoral life by the demands of an extractive industry. Throughout Europe and the USA photographers have pictured the characteristic landscapes of the industry, and continue to do so as strip mining devastates huge areas of land. Not only landscape photography but also documentary, portraiture, photojournalism and art photography have been used in order to portray mines and miners.

This book presents three interlinked strands of investigation. The first is the way in which the production of coal created paradigmatic communities grounded in particular landscapes. The second concerns the role of photography in exploring, delineating and critiquing mining communities. This in turn involves an examination of the aesthetic and social characteristics of a number of genres of photography. Lastly, it considers the growth and decline of these sites, the geographic shift of the industry to other places, and the re-presentation of traditional localities through the lens of the heritage industry and industrial tourism.
Genre: Non-Fiction > General

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Literary Cultures and Eighteenth-Century Childhoods

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The Cultures of Maimonideanism

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The Literary Cultures of East-Central Europe series

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