Hegel and Canada by Susan Dodd, Neil G. Robertson

Hegel and Canada: Unity of Opposites? by Susan Dodd, Neil G. Robertson
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Overview: Hegel has had a remarkable, yet largely unremarked, role in Canada’s intellectual development. In the last half of the twentieth-century, as Canada was coming to define itself in the wake of World War Two, some of Canada’s most thoughtful scholars turned to the work of G.W.F. Hegel for insight.

Hegel and Canada is a collection of essays that analyses the real, but under-recognized, role Hegel has played in the intellectual and political development of Canada. The volume focuses on the generation of Canadian scholars who emerged after World War Two: James Doull, Emil Fackenheim, George Grant, Henry S. Harris, and Charles Taylor. These thinkers offer a uniquely Canadian view of Hegel’s writings, and, correspondingly, of possible relations between situated community and rational law. Hegel provided a unique intellectual resource for thinking through the complex and opposing aspects that characterize Canada. The volume brings together key scholars from each of these five schools of Canadian Hegel studies and provides a richly nuanced account of the intellectually significant connection of Hegel and Canada.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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The Collected Works of G.W.F Hegel by Delphi Classics

The Collected Works of G.W.F Hegel by Delphi Classics
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 17.4 MB
Overview: The early nineteenth century philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel is an important figure of German idealism, who achieved wide recognition within the continental tradition of philosophy. He has since become increasingly influential in the analytic tradition and his canonical stature within Western philosophy is universally recognised. Hegel’s principal achievement was his development of a distinctive articulation of idealism, in which the dualisms of mind and nature and subject and object are overcome. His philosophy of spirit conceptually integrates psychology, the state, history, art, religion and philosophy. This comprehensive eBook presents Hegel’s collected works, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Hegel: A Biography by Terry Pinkard

Hegel: A Biography by Terry Pinkard
Requirements: .PDF reader, 18 MB
Overview: One of the founders of modern philosophical thought Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831) has gained the reputation of being one of the most abstruse and impenetrable of thinkers. This first major biography of Hegel in English offers not only a complete, up-to-date account of the life, but also an overview of the key philosophical concepts in Hegel’s work in an accessible style. Terry Pinkard situates Hegel firmly in the historical context of his times. The story of that life is of an ambitious, powerful thinker living in a period of great tumult dominated by the figure of Napolean. Pinkard explores Hegel’s interactions with some of the great minds of this period: Hölderlin, Goethe, Humboldt, Schelling, Novalis, the Schlegels, Mendelssohn, and others. Throughout, he avoids Hegal’s own famously technical jargon in order to display the full sweep and power of Hegel’s thought. Terry Pinkard is professor of Philosophy at Northwestern University and is author/editor of five previous books, the most recent being ^UHegel’s Phenomenology (Cambridge, 1996). He is honorary Professor of the Philosophy Faculty of TÜbingen University, Germany and serves on the advisory board for the Zeitschrift fÜr Philosophique Forschung
Genre: Non-Fiction > Biographies & Memoirs

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Hegel’s Philosophy of Reality, Freedom by Robert M. Wallace

Hegel’s Philosophy of Reality, Freedom, and God (Modern European Philosophy) by Robert M. Wallace
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Overview: This book shows that the repeated announcements of the death of Hegel’s philosophical system have been premature. Hegel’s Philosophy of Freedom, Reality, and God brings to light accomplishments for which Hegel is seldom given credit: unique arguments for the reality of freedom, for the reality of knowledge, for the irrationality of egoism, and for the compatibility of key insights from traditional theism and naturalistic atheism. The book responds in a systematic manner to many of the major criticisms leveled at Hegel’s system, from Feuerbach and Kierkegaard to Heidegger and Charles Taylor. It provides detailed interpretations of Hegel’s Philosophy of Spirit, large parts of his indispensable Science of Logic, and important parts of his Philosophy of Nature and Philosophy of Right. Unlike many academic books on Hegel, this one treats him very much as a ‘live’ thinker, whom we can learn from today.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Hegel’s Naturalism by Terry Pinkard

Hegel’s Naturalism: Mind, Nature, and the Final Ends of Life by Terry Pinkard
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Overview: Terry Pinkard draws on Hegel’s central works as well as his lectures on aesthetics, the history of philosophy, and the philosophy of history in this deeply informed and original exploration of Hegel’s naturalism. As Pinkard explains, Hegel’s version of naturalism was in fact drawn from Aristotelian naturalism: Hegel fused Aristotle’s conception of nature with his insistence that the origin and development of philosophy has empirical physics as its presupposition. As a result, Hegel found that, although modern nature must be understood as a whole to be non-purposive, there is nonetheless a place for Aristotelian purposiveness within such nature. Such a naturalism provides the framework for explaining how we are both natural organisms and also practically minded (self-determining, rationally responsive, reason-giving) beings. In arguing for this point, Hegel shows that the kind of self-division which is characteristic of human agency also provides human agents with an updated version of an Aristotelian final end of life. Pinkard treats this conception of the final end of "being at one with oneself" in two parts. The first part focuses on Hegel’s account of agency in naturalist terms and how it is that agency requires such a self-division, while the second part explores how Hegel thinks a historical narration is essential for understanding what this kind of self-division has come to require of itself. In making his case, Hegel argues that both the antinomies of philosophical thought and the essential fragmentation of modern life are all not to be understood as overcome in a higher order unity in the "State." On the contrary, Hegel demonstrates that modern institutions do not resolve such tensions any more than a comprehensive philosophical account can resolve them theoretically. The job of modern practices and institutions (and at a reflective level the task of modern philosophy) is to help us understand and live with precisely the unresolvability of these oppositions. Therefore, Pinkard explains, Hegel is not the totality theorist he has been taken to be, nor is he an "identity thinker," à la Adorno. He is an anti-totality thinker.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Hegel on Freedom and Authority by Renato Cristi

Hegel on Freedom and Authority by Renato Cristi
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Overview: While Hegel’s political philosophy has been attacked on the left by republican democrats and on the right by feudalist reactionaries, his apologists see him as a liberal reformer, a moderate who theorized about the development of a free-market society within the bounds of a stabilizing constitutional state. This centrist view has gained ascendancy since the end of the Second World War, enshrining Hegel within the liberal tradition.

In this book, Renato Cristi argues that, like the Prussian liberal reformers of his time, Hegel was committed to expand the scope of a free economy and concurrently to ensure that the social practice of subjective freedom did not endanger political stability and order. Aware that a system of mutual advantage failed to integrate the members of civil society and that profound social disharmonies were ineradicable, Hegel adopted the views of the French liberal doctrinaires, who sought to realize the principles of the French Revolution by supporting Louis XVIII’s sovereign assertion of the monarchical principle. Not surprisingly, Hegel hailed the French Charte of June 1814 as a beacon of freedom. Endorsement of the monarchical principle was meant to prevent the atomized individuals of civil society from gaining control of the state through appeals to popular sovereignty. This challenges most conventional interpretations of Hegel’s theory of the state and draws it closer to the conservative-authoritarian end of the political spectrum than is usual.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts by Michael Baur

G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts by Michael Baur
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Overview: The thought of G. W. F. Hegel (1770 -1831) has had a deep and lasting influence on a wide range of philosophical, political, religious, aesthetic, cultural and scientific movements. But, despite the far-reaching importance of Hegel’s thought, there is often a great deal of confusion about what he actually said or believed.

G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts provides an accessible introduction to both Hegel’s thought and Hegel-inspired philosophy in general, demonstrating how his concepts were understood, adopted and critically transformed by later thinkers. The first section of the book covers the principal philosophical themes in Hegel’s system: epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, ethical theory, political philosophy, philosophy of nature, philosophy of art, philosophy of religion, philosophy of history and theory of the history of philosophy. The second section covers the main post-Hegelian movements in philosophy: Marxism, existentialism, pragmatism, analytic philosophy, hermeneutics and French poststructuralism.

The breadth and depth of G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts makes it an invaluable introduction for philosophical beginners and a useful reference source for more advanced scholars and researchers.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Hegel: Philosophy in an Hour by Paul Strathern

Hegel: Philosophy in an Hour by Paul Strathern
Requirements: .MP3 reader, 35.2 MB
Overview: Philosophy for busy people. Listen to a succinct account of the philosophy of Hegel in just one hour. With Hegel philosophy became very difficult indeed – even the great man himself conceded that ‘only one man understands me, and even he does not.’ His dialectical method produced the most grandiose metaphysical system known to humanity, and included absolutely everything, its most vital element being the dialectic of the thesis, antithesis and synthesis. This method arose from Hegel’s ambition to overcome the deficiencies of logic and ascend towards Mind as the ultimate reality. His view of history as a process of humanity’s self-realisation ultimately inspired Marx to synthesise his philosophy of dialectical materialism. This audiobook is an expert account of Hegel’s life and philosophical ideas – entertainingly written and is easy to listen to. Also included are selections from Hegel’s work, suggested further reading, and chronologies that place Hegel in the context of the broader scheme of philosophy.
Genre: Audiobooks > Non-Fiction

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The Philosophy of Hegel by Allen Speight

The Philosophy of Hegel by Allen Speight
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Overview: Few philosophers can induce as much puzzlement among students as Hegel. His works are notoriously dense and make very few concessions for a readership unfamiliar with his systematic view of the world. Allen Speight’s introduction to Hegel’s philosophy takes a chronological perspective on the development of Hegel’s system. In this way, some of the most important questions in Hegelian scholarship are illuminated by examining in their respective contexts works such as the Phenomenology and the Logic. Speight begins with the young Hegel and his writings prior to the Phenomenology focusing on the notion of positivity and how Hegel’s social, economic and religious concerns became linked to systematic and logical ones. He then examines the Phenomenology in detail, including its treatment of scepticism, the problem of immediacy, the transition from consciousness to self-consciousness, and the emergence of the social and historical category of Spirit. The following chapter explores the Logic, paying particular attention to a number of vexed issues associated with Hegel’s claims to systematicity and the relation between the categories of Hegel’s logic and nature or spirit (Geist). The final chapters discuss Hegel’s ethical and political thought and the three elements of his notion of absolute spirit: art, religion and philosophy, as well as the importance of history to his philosophical approach as a whole.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Marx and Hegel at the Dialectic of the Individual and the Social

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Less Than Nothing: Hegel and the Shadow of Dialectical Materialism

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Hegel’s Critique of Kant by Sally Sedgwick

Hegel’s Critique of Kant: From Dichotomy to Identity by Sally Sedgwick
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Overview: Sally Sedgwick presents a fresh account of Hegel’s critique of Kant’s theoretical philosophy. She argues that Hegel offers a compelling critique of and alternative to the conception of cognition that Kant defended in his "Critical" period. The book examines key features of what Kant identifies as the "discursive" character of our mode of cognition, and considers Hegel’s reasons for arguing that these features condemn Kant’s theoretical philosophy to scepticism as well as dualism. Sedgwick goes on to present in a sympathetic light Hegel’s claim to derive from certain Kantian doctrines clues to a superior form of idealism, a form of idealism that better captures the nature of our cognitive powers and their relation to objects.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Hegel’s Introduction to the System

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Hegel and the Metaphysics of Absolute Negativity (Modern European Philosophy)

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