Infantry Uniforms Book Two: Including Artillery And …

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Infantry Uniforms 1742-1855: Including Artillery And Other …

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Infantry Uniforms Book Two: Including Artillery and Other Supporting Corps of Britain and the Commonwealth 1855-1939

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Infantry Uniforms 1742-1855: Including Artillery and Other Supporting Corps of Britain and the Commonwealth

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Austro-hungarian Infantry 1914-1918

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Russian Grenadiers And Infantry 1799-1815

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Infantry Attacks


Infantry Attacks
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World War II Infantry Anti-Tank Tactics by Gordon L. Rottman

International Battle II Infantry Anti-Tank Ways (Elite) through Gordon L. Rottman
Necessities: .PDF reader, 18 MB
Review: The battlefield interplay between infantry and tanks was once central to battle on maximum fronts in International Battle II (1939-1945). The primary ‘Blitzkrieg’ campaigns noticed the tank reach a brand new dominance. New infantry techniques and guns – a few of them desperately bad – needed to be followed, whilst the armies raced to broaden extra tough anti-tank weapons and new mild guns. By means of 1945, a brand new technology of innovative shoulder-fired AT guns was once in well-liked use. This guide explains intimately the moving patterns of anti-tank battle, illustrated with pictures, diagrams and color plates appearing how guns had been in fact hired at the battlefield.
Style: Non-Fiction > Historical past

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French Infantry Tanks, Part 1 by James Bingham

French Infantry Tanks, Half 1: Chars 2C, D and B (AFV/Weapons Profile No. 58) by James Bingham
Necessities: .PDF reader, 25.three mb
Overview: About French Tanks of World Struggle 2. Loaded with photographs and historical past and contains two pages of coloration profiles.
Style: Non-Fiction > Historical past

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Austro-Hungarian Infantry 1914-1918

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Wehrmacht Infantry Divisions by Castle Rock Publishing

Wehrmacht Infantry Divisions 6th to 10th, 1934-1945 by Castle Rock Publishing
Requirements: .PDF reader, 4.6 mb
Overview: The 6th Infantry Division (6. Infanterie-Division) was a unit of the German Army during World War II. Formed in October 1934 from Infanterieführer V in Bielefeld, the division was mobilized on 26 August 1939 for the upcoming invasion of Poland. At that time, it consisted of the usual German infantry division elements: three infantry regiments of three battalions each, one three-battalion regiment of light artillery, one battalion of heavy artillery (from a separate artillery regiment, but attached to the particular division), a Panzerjäger (anti-tank) Battalion, a reconnaissance (Aufklärungs) Battalion, a Signals Battalion, a Pioneer (Engineer) Battalion, and divisional supply, medical, and administrative units. In 1944 the division was first renamed 6. Grenadier-Division (25 July 1944) and again in 6. Volksgrenadier-Division (9 October 1944). The division was destroyed during the Soviet Vistula-Oder Offensive in January 1945 and reestablished as 6. Infanterie-Division (10 March 1945) using elements of Shadow Division Dresden.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Infantry Uniforms of the British Army by P. H. Smitherman

Infantry Uniforms of the British Army 1790-1846 by P. H. Smitherman
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Overview: In 1790 the army was in a very bad state, owing to political neglect, but the shock of the Napoleonic wars, which began in 1793, pulled it together, and by 1815, when Napoleon was finally defeated at Waterloo, it was an efficient fighting force. After 1815 the army was again neglected, but not to the previous extent, the interest of George IV and William IV being sartorial. By 1846 the individual regiments were reasonably efficient, but the administration was appalling, as the war in the Crimea would demonstrate. The late 18th century saw the army involved in North America, which showed the inadequacy of our infantry training. In 1770 a light company was added to each battalion. Infantry tactics became far more flexible. Sir John Moore organised the Light Brigade, which became the Light Division, and they had a great influence on infantry training. Moore also insisted that his officers know his men well – as had General Wolfe in Canada. Close contact between officers and men became something of which the army is proud. Barracks were built to house the men – the improvement in morale was immediate and striking. At the end of the eighteenth century the army was fighting Napoleon, in Spain and Portugal, engaged in India, and, owing to Pitt’s policy of ‘filching sugar islands’, garrisons had to be found for the West Indies. Losses in India and the West Indies were appalling, diseases such as dysentery, cholera and yellow fever almost, on occasions, destroying whole battalions. These men, given the proper lead which they got from such commanders as Moore and Wellington, formed a body which in its day was unsurpassed.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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Wehrmacht 1st Infantry Division by Castle Rock Publishing (.PDF)

Wehrmacht 1st Infantry Division 1935-1945 by Castle Rock Publishing
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Overview: Originally formed as the beginning of Germany’s first wave of rearmament, the division was first given the title of Artillerieführer I and only later called Wehrgauleitung Königsberg. These names were an effort to cover Germany’s expansion of infantry divisions from seven to twenty-one. The division’s infantry regiments were built up from the 1.(Preussisches) Infanterie-Regiment of the 1.Division of the Reichswehr and originally consisted of recruits from East Prussia. The unit’s Prussian heritage is represented by the Hohenzollern coat of arms that served as the divisional insignia. Upon the official revelation of the Wehrmacht in October 1935, the unit received its title of 1.Infanterie-Division. In February 1936, the headquarters of the division was moved from Insterburg to Königsberg.
With the German invasion of Poland in September 1939, the 1st Infantry Division advanced toward Warsaw as a component of the XXVI Army Corps in von Küchler’s 3rd Army. It engaged Polish forces near the heavily-defended town of Mława (see Battle of Mława) for several days, then crossed over the Bug and Narew Rivers. It fought again near Węgrów and Garwolin and ended the campaign east of Warsaw. Playing a minor role in the invasion of France, the division returned to East Prussia in the autumn of 1940. With the launch of Operation Barbarossa, the 1st Infantry Division entered the Soviet Union as part of the 18th Army with Army Group North, advancing on Leningrad. It remained and fought in the area of Leningrad and Lake Ladoga through December 1943. (See Siege of Leningrad.) Transferred to the 1st Panzer Army, the division fought at Krivoy Rog and broke out of encirclement in March 1944.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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