Islamic Politics, Muslim States by Peter Henne

Islamic Politics, Muslim States, and Counterterrorism Tensions by Peter Henne
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Overview: The US Global War on Terror and earlier US counterterrorism efforts prompted a variety of responses from Muslim states despite widespread Islamic opposition. Some cooperated extensively, some balked at US policy priorities, and others vacillated between these extremes. This book explains how differing religion-state relationships, regimes’ political calculations, and Islamic politics combined to produce patterns of tensions and cooperation between the United States and Muslim states over counterterrorism, using rigorous quantitative analysis and case studies of Pakistan, the United Arab Emirates, and Turkey. The book combines recent advances in the study of political institutions with work on religion and politics to advance a novel theory of religion and international relations that will be of value to anyone studying religion, terrorism, or Islamic politics. It also provides numerous insights into current events in the Middle East by extending its analysis to the Arab Spring and the rise of the Islamic State.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Educational

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The Islamic State by Anthony Celso +

The Islamic State: A Comparative History of Jihadist Warfare by Anthony Celso
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Overview: This book analyses the Islamic State (IS) within a comparative framework of past Sunni jihadist movements. It argues jihadist failure to overthrow Muslim apostate states has led to a progressive radicalization of violent Islamist terror networks. This outcome has contributed over time to more brutal jihadist doctrines and tactics contributing to a total war doctrine strategy targeting Muslim apostate states (the near enemy), non-Muslim civilizations ( the far enemy) and sectarian minorities (heterodox Muslims and Christians). These extremist tendencies have been building for over a generation and have reached their culmination in the rise and fall of the Islamic State’s caliphate. Given past tendencies the emergence of yet even more radical Sunni jihadist movement is probable.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Educational > Politics & Social Sciences

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The Islam in Islamic Terrorism by Ibn Warraq

The Islam in Islamic Terrorism: The Importance of Beliefs, Ideas, and Ideology by Ibn Warraq
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Overview: Ibn Warraq addresses several misconceptions regarding the cause of Islamic terrorism. Many scholars refuse to take into account the beliefs of the terrorists, and many seem to think that Islamic terrorism has emerged only in the last forty years or so. Many analysts believe that the United States was targeted because of its foreign policy, while others opine that we have to dig out the root causes which are essentially socioeconomic, with poverty as the favorite explanation. Ibn Warraq, on the other hand, argues that we must take the beliefs of the jihadists seriously. The acts of ISIS or the Taliban or any other jihadist group are not random acts of violence by a mob of psychopathic, sexually frustrated, impoverished vandals, but carefully and strategically planned operations that are a part of a long campaign by educated, affluent Muslims who wish to bring about the establishment of an Islamic state based on the Shari a, the Islamic Holy Law derived from the Koran, the Sunna and the Hadith. Nor did Islamic terrorism emerge, ex nihilo, in the past forty years or so. From its foundation in the seventh century, violent movements have arisen seeking to revive true Islam, which its members felt had been neglected in Muslim societies, who were not living up to the ideals of the earliest Muslims. Thus, the answer to the cause of Islamic terrorism, according to Ibn Warraq, lies in Islamic theology (especially the concepts of jihad and Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong), and Islamic history, both of which he examines closely. This is borne out by what the Islamists themselves tell us, hence Ibn Warraq s detailed examination of the writings of key Islamic thinkers of the past, such as Ibn Taymiyya, and modern activists, from Mawdudi to Khomeini.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Animals in Islamic Traditions by Richard Foltz +

Animals in Islamic Traditions and Muslim Cultures by Richard Foltz
Requirements: .ePUB, .PDF reader, 2.4 MB
Overview: This book, the first of its kind, surveys Islamic and Muslim attitudes towards animals, and human responsibilities towards them, through Islam’s philosophy, literature, mysticism and art.
Genre: Non-Fiction > General

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Animals in Islamic Traditions by Richard Foltz

Animals in Islamic Traditions and Muslim Cultures by Richard Foltz
Requirements: PDF Reader | 5 MB
Overview: This book, the first of its kind, surveys Islamic and Muslim attitudes towards animals, and human responsibilities towards them, through Islam’s philosophy, literature, mysticism and art.
Genre: Non Fiction | Philosophy, Religion > Islam

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Arabic Literary Salons in Islamic Middle Ages by Samer M. Ali

Arabic Literary Salons in the Islamic Middle Ages: Poetry, Public Performance, and the Presentation of the Past by Samer M. Ali
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Overview: Arabic literary salons emerged in ninth-century Iraq and, by the tenth, were flourishing in Baghdad and other urban centers. In an age before broadcast media and classroom education, salons were the primary source of entertainment and escape for middle- and upper-rank members of society, serving also as a space and means for educating the young. Although salons relied on a culture of oral performance from memory, scholars of Arabic literature have focused almost exclusively on the written dimensions of the tradition. That emphasis, argues Samer Ali, has neglected the interplay of oral and written, as well as of religious and secular knowledge in salon society, and the surprising ways in which these seemingly discrete categories blurred in the lived experience of participants. Looking at the period from 500 to 1250, and using methods from European medieval studies, folklore, and cultural anthropology, Ali interprets Arabic manuscripts in order to answer fundamental questions about literary salons as a social institution. He identifies salons not only as sites for socializing and educating, but as loci for performing literature and oral history; for creating and transmitting cultural identity; and for continually reinterpreting the past. A fascinating recovery of a key element of humanistic culture, Ali’s work will encourage a recasting of our understanding of verbal art, cultural memory, and daily life in medieval Arab culture.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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