Exiled in Modernity by David O’Brien

Exiled in Modernity: Delacroix, Civilization, and Barbarism by David O’Brien
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 35.5MB
Overview: Notions of civilization and barbarism were intrinsic to Eugene Delacroix’s artistic practice: he wrote regularly about these concepts in his journal, and the tensions between the two were the subject of numerous paintings, including his most ambitious mural project, the ceiling of the Library of the Chamber of Deputies in the Palais Bourbon. Exiled in Modernity delves deeply into these themes, revealing why Delacroix’s disillusionment with modernity increasingly led him to seek spiritual release or epiphany in the sensual qualities of painting. While civilization implied a degree of control and the constraint of natural impulses for Delacroix, barbarism evoked something uncontrolled and impulsive. Seeing himself as part of a grand tradition extending back to ancient Greece, Delacroix was profoundly aware of the wealth and power that set nineteenth-century Europe apart from the rest of the world. Yet he was fascinated by civilization’s chaotic underbelly.
Genre: Non-Fiction > General > European Art History

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Crossing Borders: Modernity, Ideology, And Culture In …

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American Dharma: Buddhism Beyond Modernity by way of Ann Gleig

American Dharma: Buddhism Beyond Modernity by way of Ann Gleig
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 814 KB
Overview: The previous couple of a long time have witnessed Buddhist communities each proceeding the modernization of Buddhism and wondering a few of its obstacles. In this interesting portrait of a all of a sudden converting spiritual panorama, Ann Gleig illuminates the aspirations and struggles of more youthful North American Buddhists all over a length she identifies as a definite degree within the assimilation of Buddhism to the West. She observes each the emergence of recent leading edge sorts of deinstitutionalized Buddhism that blur the limits between the spiritual and secular, and a revalorization of conventional parts of Buddhism, akin to ethics and group, that had been discarded within the modernization procedure.

Based on intensive ethnographic and textual analysis, the ebook levels from mindfulness debates within the Vipassana community to the intercourse scandals in American Zen, whilst exploring problems round racial variety and social justice, the have an effect on of recent applied sciences, and generational variations between child boomer, Gen X, and millennial lecturers.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Wasted Lives: Modernity and Its Outcasts by Zygmunt Bauman

Wasted Lives: Modernity and Its Outcasts by Zygmunt Bauman
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 599 KB
Overview: The production of ‘human waste’ – or more precisely, wasted lives, the ‘superfluous’ populations of migrants, refugees and other outcasts – is an inevitable outcome of modernization. It is an unavoidable side-effect of economic progress and the quest for order which is characteristic of modernity.

As long as large parts of the world remained wholly or partly unaffected by modernization, they were treated by modernizing societies as lands that were able to absorb the excess of population in the ‘developed countries’. Global solutions were sought, and temporarily found, to locally produced overpopulation problems. But as modernization has reached the furthest lands of the planet, ‘redundant population’ is produced everywhere and all localities have to bear the consequences of modernity’s global triumph. They are now confronted with the need to seek – in vain, it seems – local solutions to globally produced problems. The global spread of the modernity has given rise to growing quantities of human beings who are deprived of adequate means of survival, but the planet is fast running out of places to put them. Hence the new anxieties about ‘immigrants’ and ‘asylum seekers’ and the growing role played by diffuse ‘security fears’ on the contemporary political agenda.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Educational

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Tropical Forests in Human Prehistory, History, and Modernity

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Sensationalism and the Genealogy of Modernity: A Global…


Sensationalism and the Genealogy of Modernity: A Global Nineteenth-Century Perspective
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Sensationalism and the Genealogy of Modernity: A Global Nineteenth-Century Perspective

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Modernity’s Wager: Authority, the Self, and Transcendence

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Modernity’s Wager by Adam B. Seligman (.AZW3)

Modernity’s Wager: Authority, the Self, and Transcendence by Adam B. Seligman
Requirements: .ePUB, .MOBI/.AZW reader, 1.5MB
Overview: Adam Seligman, one of our most important social thinkers, continues the incisive critique of modernity he began in his previously acclaimed The Idea of Civil Society and The Problem of Trust. In this provocative new work of social philosophy, Seligman evaluates modernity’s wager, namely, the gambit to liberate the modern individual from external social and religious norms by supplanting them with the rational self as its own moral authority. Yet far from ensuring the freedom of the individual, Seligman argues, "the fundamentalist doctrine of enlightened reason has called into being its own nemesis" in the forms of ethnic, racial, and identity politics. Seligman counters that the modern human must recover a notion of authority that is essentially transcendent, but which extends tolerance to those of other-or no-faiths.

Through its denial of an authority rooted in an experience of transcendence, modernity fails to account for individual and collective moral action. First, deprived of a sacred source of the self, depictions of moral action are reduced to motives of self interest. Second, dismissing the sacred leaves the resurgence of religious movements unexplained.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Paris, Capital of Modernity by David Harvey

Paris, Capital of Modernity by David Harvey
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 6 MB
Overview: Collecting David Harvey’s finest work on Paris during the second empire, Paris, Capital of Modernity offers brilliant insights ranging from the birth of consumerist spectacle on the Parisian boulevards, the creative visions of Balzac, Baudelaire and Zola, and the reactionary cultural politics of the bombastic Sacre Couer. The book is heavily illustrated and includes a number drawings, portraits and cartoons by Daumier, one of the greatest political caricaturists of the nineteenth century.
Genre: Non-Fiction > General

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Bending Steel: Modernity and the American Superhero


Bending Metal: Modernity and the American Superhero
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Bending Steel: Modernity and the American Superhero


Bending Steel: Modernity and the American Superhero
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Music Hall & Modernity by Barry J. Faulk

Music Hall & Modernity: Late Victorian Discovery Of Popular Culture by Barry J. Faulk
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 2.3MB
Overview: The late-Victorian discovery of the music hall by English intellectuals marks a crucial moment in the history of popular culture. Music Hall and Modernity demonstrates how such pioneering cultural critics as Arthur Symons and Elizabeth Robins Pennell used the music hall to secure and promote their professional identity as guardians of taste and national welfare. These social arbiters were, at the same time, devotees of the spontaneous culture of “the people.”

In examining fiction from Walter Besant, Hall Caine, and Henry Nevinson, performance criticism from William Archer and Max Beerbohm, and late-Victorian controversies over philanthropy and moral reform, scholar Barry Faulk argues that discourse on music-hall entertainment helped consolidate the identity and tastes of an emergent professional class. Critics and writers legitimized and cleaned up the music hall, at the same time allowing issues of class, respect, and empowerment to be negotiated.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Educational

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Salome’s Modernity by Petra Dierkes-Thrun

Salome’s Modernity: Oscar Wilde and the Aesthetics of Transgression by Petra Dierkes-Thrun
Requirements: .ePUB, .MOBI/.AZW reader, 1.6MB
Overview: A study of Oscar Wilde’s Salomé in modernist and postmodernist literature and culture.

Oscar Wilde’s 1891 symbolist tragedy Salomé has had a rich afterlife in literature, opera, dance, film, and popular culture. Salome’s Modernity: Oscar Wilde and the Aesthetics of Transgression is the first comprehensive scholarly exploration of that extraordinary resonance that persists to the present.

Petra Dierkes-Thrun positions Wilde as a founding figure of modernism and Salomé as a key text in modern culture’s preoccupation with erotic and aesthetic transgression, arguing that Wilde’s Salomé marks a major turning point from a dominant traditional cultural, moral, and religious outlook to a utopian aesthetic of erotic and artistic transgression. Wilde and Salomé are seen to represent a bridge linking the philosophical and artistic projects of writers such as Mallarmé, Pater, and Nietzsche to modernist and postmodernist literature and philosophy and our contemporary culture.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Educational

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