Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche by Christopher Janaway

Beyond Selflessness: Reading Nietzsche’s Genealogy by Christopher Janaway
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Overview: Christopher Janaway presents a full commentary on Nietzsche’s most studied work, On the Genealogy of Morality, and combines close reading of key passages with an overview of Nietzsche’s wider aims. Arguing that Nietzsche’s goal is to pursue psychological and historical truths concerning the origins of modern moral values, Beyond Selflessness differs from other books on Nietzsche in that it emphasizes the significance of his rhetorical methods as an instrument of persuasion. Nietzsche’s outlook is broadly naturalist, but he is critical of typical scientific and philosophical methods for their advocacy of impersonality and suppression of the affects. In contrast to his opponents, Schopenhauer and Paul Ree, who both account for morality in terms of selflessness, Nietzsche believes that our allegiance to a post-Christian morality that centres around selflessness, compassion, guilt, and denial of the instincts is not primarily rational but affective: underlying feelings, often ambivalent and poorly grasped in conscious thought, explain our moral beliefs. The Genealogy is designed to detach the reader from his or her allegiance to morality and prepare for the possibility of new values. In addition to examining how Nietzsche’s "perspectivism" holds that one can best understand a topic such as morality through allowing as many of one’s feelings as possible to speak about it, Janaway shows that Nietzsche seeks to enable us to "feel differently" his provocation of the reader’s affects helps us grasp the affective origins of our attitudes and prepare the way for healthier values such as the affirmation of life (as tested by the thought of eternal return) and the self-satisfaction to be attained by "giving style to one’s character."
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Nietzsche’s Great Politics by Hugo Drochon

Nietzsche’s Great Politics by Hugo Drochon
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 2 MB
Overview: Nietzsche’s impact on the world of culture, philosophy, and the arts is uncontested, but his political thought remains mired in controversy. By placing Nietzsche back in his late-nineteenth-century German context, "Nietzsche’s Great Politics" moves away from the disputes surrounding Nietzsche’s appropriation by the Nazis and challenges the use of the philosopher in postmodern democratic thought. Rather than starting with contemporary democratic theory or continental philosophy, Hugo Drochon argues that Nietzsche’s political ideas must first be understood in light of Bismarck’s policies, in particular his "Great Politics," which transformed the international politics of the late nineteenth century.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle by Pierre Klossowski

Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle by Pierre Klossowski
Requirements: .PDF reader, 3.6 MB
Overview: ‘The greatest book of philosophy I have ever read, on a par with Nietzsche himself.’ –Michel Foucault

Pierre Klossowski (1905-2001) is the author of numerous philosophical works, as well as several novels. He published many translations of German poets and philosophers, including Nietzsche himself.

Recognized as a masterpiece of Nietzsche scholarship, Nietzsche and the Vicious Circle emphasises and explores the notion of Eternal Return – central to an understanding of Nietzsche’s self-denial, self-refutation and self-consumption.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Nietzsche and The Antichrist by Daniel Conway

Nietzsche and The Antichrist: Religion, Politics, and Culture in Late Modernity (Bloomsbury Studies in Continental Philosophy) by Daniel Conway
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 379 KB
Overview: This collection both reflects and contributes to the recent surge of philosophical interest in The Antichrist and represents a major contribution to Nietzsche studies.

Nietzsche regarded The Antichrist, along with Zarathustra, as his most important work. In it he outlined many epoch-defining ideas, including his dawning realisation of the ‘death of God’ and the inception of a new, post-moral epoch in Western history. He called the work ‘a crisis without equal on earth, the most profound collision of conscience, a decision that was conjured up against everything that had been believed, demanded, hallowed’.

One certainly need not share Nietzsche’s estimation of his achievement in The Antichrist to conclude that there is something significant going on in this work. Indeed, even if Nietzsche overestimated its transformative power, it would be valuable nonetheless to have a clearer sense of why he thought so highly of this particular book, which is something of an outlier in his oeuvre. Until now, there has been no book that attempts to account with philosophical precision for the multiple themes addressed in this difficult and complex work.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Nietzsche and The Antichrist by Daniel Conway

Nietzsche and The Antichrist: Religion, Politics, and Culture in Late Modernity (Bloomsbury Studies in Continental Philosophy) by Daniel Conway
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 379 KB
Overview: This collection both reflects and contributes to the recent surge of philosophical interest in The Antichrist and represents a major contribution to Nietzsche studies.

Nietzsche regarded The Antichrist, along with Zarathustra, as his most important work. In it he outlined many epoch-defining ideas, including his dawning realisation of the ‘death of God’ and the inception of a new, post-moral epoch in Western history. He called the work ‘a crisis without equal on earth, the most profound collision of conscience, a decision that was conjured up against everything that had been believed, demanded, hallowed’.

One certainly need not share Nietzsche’s estimation of his achievement in The Antichrist to conclude that there is something significant going on in this work. Indeed, even if Nietzsche overestimated its transformative power, it would be valuable nonetheless to have a clearer sense of why he thought so highly of this particular book, which is something of an outlier in his oeuvre. Until now, there has been no book that attempts to account with philosophical precision for the multiple themes addressed in this difficult and complex work.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Faith, Beliefs & Philosophy

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Nietzsche by Crane Brinton

Nietzsche by Crane Brinton
Requirements: .PDF reader, 13.2 MB
Overview: Since the rise of Hitler, Nietzsche has been talked of and written about as one of the Early Fathers of National Socialism. There were, it is true, many attempts to make him out as one of the writers whose doctrines brought about the first World War, but that opinion was never so definitely fixed in the popular mind as is his underlying responsibility for the present chaos. There can be no doubt that a conscious effort is being made by important people in contemporary Germany to enlist him as one of the pillars of Nazi society.

Point for point Nietzsche preached, along with a good deal else which the Nazis wish to disremember, most of the cardinal articles of the professed Nazi creed: a transvaluation of all values, the sanctity of the will-to-power, the right and duty of the strong to dominate, the sole right of great states to exist, a renewing of German and hence of European society. Nietzsche was therefore an obvious candidate for first place in a new series of biographies we are inaugurating with the general title of “Makers of Modern Europe.” And the equally obvious authority to write about him was Professor Crane Brinton of Harvard, an established historian of modern revolutionary movements and a brilliant writer. His biography gives the general reader exactly the information necessary for an intelligent estimate of The Prophet of Nazism.

After a sketch of Nietzsche’s life, Brinton makes an analysis of his ideas and then considers the surprising growth of his reputation and influence since 1889, the year when he was confined to an insane asylum. The analysis is that of an historian, not that of a technical and professional philosopher; it avoids abstract terminology and fine-spun distinctions, considering Nietzsche rather as an element in the intellectual history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. At the same time Brinton writes with unusual ease and with a captivating sense of humor. The result is a biography that must be read by everyone who wishes to penetrate beneath the disturbed surface of our present world.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Biographies & Memoirs

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