Prairie Man by Norman E. Matteoni

Prairie Man: The Struggle between Sitting Bull and Indian Agent James McLaughlin by Norman E. Matteoni
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 2.1MB
Overview: One week after the infamous June 1876 Battle of the Little Big Horn, when news of the defeat of General George Armstrong Custer and his 7th Cavalry troops reached the American public, Sitting Bull became the most wanted hostile Indian in America. He had resisted the United States’ intrusions into Lakota prairie land for years, refused to sign treaties, and called for a gathering of tribes at Little Big Horn. He epitomized resistance. Sitting Bull’s role at Little Big Horn has been the subject of hundreds of historical works, but while Sitting Bull was in fact present, he did not engage in the battle. The conflict with Custer was a benchmark to the subsequent events. There are other battles than those of war, and the conflict between Sitting Bull and Indian Agent James McLaughlin was one of those battles. Theirs was a fight over the hearts and minds of the Lakota. U.S. Government policy toward Native Americans after Little Big Horn was to give them a makeover as Americans after finally and firmly displacing them from their lands. They were to be reconstituted as Christian, civilized and made farmers. Sitting Bull, when forced to accept reservation life, understood who was in control, but his view of reservation life was very different from that of the Indian Bureau and its agents. His people’s birth right was their native heritage and culture. Although redrawn by the Government, he believed that the prairie land still held a special meaning of place for the Lakota. Those in power dictated a contrary view – with the closing of the frontier, the Indian was challenged to accept the white road or vanish, in the case of the Lakota, that position was given personification in the form of Agent James McLaughlin. This book explores the story within their conflict and offers new perspectives and insights.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Biographies & Memoirs

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1066: A New History of the Norman Conquest by Peter Rex

1066: A New History of the Norman Conquest by Peter Rex
Requirements: .ePUB and .MOBI readers | 3,193 MB
Overview: A radical retelling of the most important event in English history – the Norman invasion of 1066. The Norman Conquest is the single most important event in English history. On this invasion and ‘regime change’ pivoted the second millennium of English history. This is well recognised, what is not is how long and hard the English people fought to deny William ‘the Bastard’, Duke of Normandy his prize. Rather than being the smooth transition peddled by pro-Norman historians, the Norman Conquest was a brutal and violent takeover by an army of occupation. Unknown thousands of rebellious thegns resisted the Norman regime, the most famous being Hereward, but there were plenty of willing collaborators among England’s clergy, who pushed for William to be crowned king. In return he let them retain their sees and abbacies, as well as the vast tracts of land. Peter Rex tells the whole story of the Conquest of England by the Normans from its genesis in the deathbed decision of King Edward the Confessor in January 1066 to recommend Harold Godwinson as his successor, to the crushing of the last flickers of English resistance in June 1076.
Genre: Non Fiction > History

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Norman McLaren: Between the Frames by Nichola Dobson

Norman McLaren: Between the Frames by Nichola Dobson
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 6,3 Mb
Overview: Animator Norman McLaren is best known for his experimental films using pioneering techniques and his work as founder of the animation department of the National Film Board of Canada (NFB), but little mention is made of his Scottish heritage or his personal life. Nichola Dobson examines some of the key events and people in his life through a close examination of his key works and his personal papers, and discusses how influential they were. By using archive material to discover his personal identity and close readings of his films, Norman McLaren rediscovers one of the most important figures in animation history.
Genre: Non-Fiction > General › Film › Genres

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The Fifth Impossibility by Norman Manea

The Fifth Impossibility: Essays on Exile and Language by Norman Manea
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 442 KB
Overview: Deported to a concentration camp from 1941 until the end of the war, Norman Manea again left his native Romania in 1986 to escape the Ceausescu regime. He now lives in New York. In this selection of essays, he explores the language and psyche of the exiled writer.

Among pieces on the cultural-political landscape of Eastern Europe and on the North America of today, there are astute critiques of fellow Romanian and American writers. Manea answers essential questions on censorship and on linguistic roots. He unravels the relationship of the mother tongue to the difficulties of translation. Above all, he describes what homelessness means for the writer.
These essays-many translated here for the first time-are passionate, lucid, and enriching, conveying a profound perspective on our troubled society.
Genre: Non-Fiction > General

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The Lesson of the Master by Norman Thomas di Giovanni

The Lesson of the Grasp by means of Norman Thomas di Giovanni
Necessities: .ePUB reader, 280 KB
Evaluation: A number of essays on Jorge Luis Borges by means of his long-time good friend and collaborator.

Jorge Luis Borges – Argentine poet, essayist, and short-story creator – is extensively regarded as one of the most giants of 20th-century global literature.

Norman Thomas di Giovanni labored along Borges for quite a few years growing English translations of his paintings, the one translations for my part overseen by means of Borges himself. In The Lesson of the Grasp, a memoir and essays, he writes about his time with Borges but additionally provides us a novel perception at the guy and his paintings.

It’s an indispensable quantity for Borges readers and his rising legion of scholars and students.
Style: Non-Fiction > Biographies & Memoirs

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The Lesson of the Master by Norman Thomas di Giovanni

The Lesson of the Grasp through Norman Thomas di Giovanni
Necessities: .ePUB reader, 280 KB
Evaluate: A choice of essays on Jorge Luis Borges through his long-time pal and collaborator.

Jorge Luis Borges – Argentine poet, essayist, and short-story creator – is extensively thought to be one of the most giants of 20th-century global literature.

Norman Thomas di Giovanni labored along Borges for various years developing English translations of his paintings, the one translations for my part overseen through Borges himself. In The Lesson of the Grasp, a memoir and essays, he writes about his time with Borges but additionally gives us a singular perception at the guy and his paintings.

It’s an indispensable quantity for Borges readers and his rising legion of scholars and students.
Style: Non-Fiction > Biographies & Memoirs

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Off the Record by Norman Pearlstine (.M4B)

Off the Report: The Press, the Authorities, and the Warfare Over Nameless Sources by Norman Pearlstine
Necessities: .M4A/.M4B reader, 249 MB
Overview: When Norman Pearlstine – as editor in chief of Time Inc. – agreed to offer prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald a reporter’s notes of a dialog with a "confidential supply", he was vilified for betraying the liberty of the press. However on this hard-hitting inside story, Pearlstine exhibits that "Plamegate" was not the clear case it gave the impression to be, and that confidentiality has change into a weapon within the White Home’s warfare on the press – a warfare fought with the unwitting complicity of the press itself.
Watergate and the publication of the Pentagon Papers are the benchmark incidents of presidency malfeasance uncovered by a fearless press. However as Pearlstine explains with nice readability and brio, the press’ starvation for a brand new Watergate has made reporters weak to officers who use confidentiality to get their message out, even when it means leaking state secrets and techniques and breaking the legislation. Prosecutors appointed to research the federal government have investigated the press as a substitute; information organizations equivalent to The New York Instances have defended the precept of confidentiality in any respect prices – implicitly placing themselves above the legislation. In the meantime, the usage of unnamed sources has change into widespread in all the things from celeb weeklies to the so-called papers of document.
What’s to be performed? Pearlstine calls on Congress to cross a federal protect legislation defending journalists from the useless intrusions of presidency; on the identical time, he calls on the press to call its sources each time potential. Off the Report is a robust argument, with the vividness and narrative drive of the very best long-form journalism. It’s positive to spark controversy among the many individuals who run the federal government – and among the many individuals who inform their tales.
Style: Audiobooks > Non-Fiction

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Hungary: A Short History by Norman Stone

Hungary: A Short History by Norman Stone
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 4.5 MB
Overview: The victors of the First World War created Hungary from the ruins of the Austro-Hungarian empire, but, in the centuries before, many called for its creation. Norman Stone traces the country’s roots from the traditional representative councils of land-owning nobles to the Magyar nationalists of the nineteenth century and the first wars of independence.

Hungary’s history since 1918 has not been a happy one. Economic collapse and hyperinflation in the post-war years led to fascist dictatorships and then Nazi occupation. Optimism at the end of the Second World War ended when the Iron Curtain descended, and Soviet tanks crushed the last hopes for independence in 1956 along with the peaceful protests in Budapest. Even after the fall of the Berlin Wall, consistent economic growth has remained elusive.

This is an extraordinary history – unique yet also representative of both the post-Soviet bloc and of nations forged from the fall of empires.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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