Ancient Greek and Roman Slavery by Peter Hunt

Ancient Greek and Roman Slavery by Peter Hunt
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 1.7MB
Overview: An exciting study of ancient slavery in Greece and Rome

This book provides an introduction to pivotal issues in the study of classical (Greek and Roman) slavery. The span of topics is broad-ranging from everyday resistance to slavery to philosophical justifications of slavery, and from the process of enslavement to the decline of slavery after the fall of the Western Roman Empire. The book uses a wide spectrum of types of evidence, and relies on concrete and vivid examples whenever possible.

Introductory chapters provide historical context and a clear and concise discussion of the methodological difficulties of studying ancient slavery. The following chapters are organized around central topics in slave studies: enslavement, economics, politics, culture, sex and family life, manumission and ex-slaves, everyday conflict, revolts, representations, philosophy and law, and decline and legacy. Chapters open with general discussions of important scholarly controversies and the challenges of our ancient evidence, and case studies from the classical Greek, Hellenistic, and Roman periods provide detailed and concrete explorations of the issues.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Educational > Literary Criticism

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Slavery, Propaganda, & American Revolution by Patricia Bradley

Slavery, Propaganda, and the American Revolution by Patricia Bradley
Requirements: EPUB Reader 1.87 MB
Overview: Under the leadership of Samuel Adams, patriot propagandists deliberately and conscientiously kept the issue of slavery off the agenda as goals for freedom were set for the American Revolution.
By comparing coverage in the publications of the patriot press with those of the moderate colonial press, this book finds that the patriots avoided, misinterpreted, or distorted news reports on blacks and slaves, even in the face of a vigorous antislavery movement. The Boston Gazette, the most important newspaper of the Revolution, was chief among the periodicals that dodged or excluded abolition. The author of this study shows that The Gazette misled its readers about the notable Somerset decision that led to abolition in Great Britain. She notes also that The Gazette excluded antislavery essays, even from patriots who supported abolition. No petitions written by Boston slaves were published, nor were any writings by the black poet Phillis Wheatley. TheGazette also manipulated the racial identity of Crispus Attucks, the first casualty in the Revolution. When using the word slavery, The Gazette took care to focus it not upon abolition but upon Great Britain’s enslavement of its American colonies.
Since propaganda on behalf of the Revolution reached a high level of sophistication, and since Boston can be considered the foundry of Revolutionary propaganda, the author writes that the omission of abolition from its agenda cannot be considered as accidental but as intentional.
By the time the Revolution began, white attitudes toward blacks were firmly fixed, and these persisted long after American independence had been achieved. In Boston, notions of virtue and vigilance were shown to be negatively embodied in black colonists. These devil’s imps were long represented in blackface in Boston’s annual Pope Day parade.
Although the leaders of the Revolution did not articulate a national vision on abolition, the colonial antislavery movement was able to achieve a degree of success but only in drives through the individual colonies.
Patricia Bradley is the former director of the American Studies program at Temple University and is currently Chair of the Temple University Department of Journalism, Public Relations, and Advertising.
Genre: Non-Fiction – History

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Long previous slavery : race and the Federal Writers’ Ex-Slave Project right through the New Deal

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Long previous slavery : race and the Federal Writers’ Ex-Slave Project all the way through the New Deal

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The Afterlife of Reproductive Slavery: Biocapitalism and Black Feminism’s Philosophy of History

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Worse than slavery : Parchman Farm and the ordeal of Jim Crow justice

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Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery Secession and The Presidents War Powers [Audiobook]

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery Secession and The Presidents War Powers [Audiobook]

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Angry Abolitionists and the Rhetoric of Slavery: Moral Emotions in Social Movements (Cultural Sociology)

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Sugar: The World Corrupted: From Slavery to Obesity

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Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine by Peter Garnsey

Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine (The W. B. Stanford Memorial Lectures) by Peter Garnsey
Requirements: .PDF reader, 10.1 MB
Overview: This study, unique of its kind, asks how slavery was viewed by the leading spokesmen of Greece and Rome. There was no movement for abolition in these societies, or a vigorous debate, such as occurred in antebellum America, but this does not imply that slavery was accepted without question. This book draws on a wide range of sources, pagan, Jewish and Christian, over ten centuries, to challenge the common assumption of passive acquiescence in slavery, and the associated view that, Aristotle apart, there was no systematic thought on slavery. The work contains both a typology of attitudes to slavery ranging from critiques to justifications, and paired case studies of leading theorists of slavery, Aristotle and the Stoics, Philo and Paul, Ambrose and Augustine.
Genre: Non-Fiction > History > Ancient

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Slavery in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia

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Slavery and the University: Histories and Legacies

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Slavery: Collected Works of Mahatma Jotiba Phule by P. G. Patil

Slavery: Collected Works of Mahatma Jotiba Phule by P. G. Patil
Requirements: .PDF reader, 5.60 Mb
Overview: This brief Life Sketch of Mahatma Jotirao Phule is written by the noted the scholarDr.Y.D. Phadke. He is the editor of the Collected Words of Mahatma Phule in Marathi. Heis also an eminent scholar of Mahatma Phule and the Satyashodhak Movement.
Genre: Non-Fiction > Biography

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Slavery and the University by Leslie M. Harris

Slavery and the University by Leslie M. Harris, James T. Campbell, Alfred L. Brophy (Editors)
Requirements: .ePUB reader, 3.3MB
Overview: Slavery and the University is the first edited collection of scholarly essays devoted solely to the histories and legacies of this subject on North American campuses and in their Atlantic contexts. Gathering together contributions from scholars, activists, and administrators, the volume combines two broad bodies of work: (1) historically based interdisciplinary research on the presence of slavery at higher education institutions in terms of the development of proslavery and antislavery thought and the use of slave labor; and (2) analysis on the ways in which the legacies of slavery in institutions of higher education continued in the post-Civil War era to the present day. The collection features broadly themed essays on issues of religion, economy, and the regional slave trade of the Caribbean. It also includes case studies of slavery’s influence on specific institutions, such as Princeton University, Harvard University, Oberlin College, Emory University, and the University of Alabama. Though the roots of Slavery and the University stem from a 2011 conference at Emory University, the collection extends outward to incorporate recent findings. As such, it offers a roadmap to one of the most exciting developments in the field of U.S. slavery studies and to ways of thinking about racial diversity in the history and current practices of higher education
Genre: Non-Fiction > History

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